From Latin to English: A Necessary Transition?

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From Latin to English: A Necessary Transition?

From Latin to English.

From Latin to English.

Brendan Guillen

From Latin to English.

Brendan Guillen

Brendan Guillen

From Latin to English.

Brendan Guillen, Reporter

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As shown on September 4, 2018, in accommodation for patients, doctors are being told to abstain from using Latin and instead use English. According to the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, correspondence between patients and doctors involves “medical jargon” rather than readily understood phrases. As an example of this, the phrase twice daily instead of the abbreviation “bd” is more reasonable.

The idea is geared toward doctors working within outpatient clinics, though the concept itself is seen as beneficial to all doctors.

Another issue tackled by the change from Latin to English is the ability to further prevent miscommunication and offense due to writing to patients in the third person. This issue is observed with misgendering patients and the stigmatization of patients through phrases such as “You have AIDS” rather than “You have contracted AIDS”.

A few keywords suggested for the change are:

Dyspnoea=breathlessness

Oedema= swelling

Seizure=fit

Syncope=faint

Acute=short-term

Chronic=long-term

Cerebral=brain

Coronary=heart

Hepatic=liver

pulmonary=lung

renal=kidney

paediatric=children

No comment has been made by any medical professional currently on the desired changes.